Wednesday, January 27, 2016

I Built It Myself!

So, this has been getting some notice over on the work page...



I built* my own AR from the ground-up. Lower, upper, everything but the bolt carrier group was assembled from individual AR-15 molecules. Not only did it work, it worked pretty darn well if I may say so myself - this is easily a sub-MOA rifle. That I built*

*There's a debate raging over whether it should be called "building" or "assembling." There are those that feel that since all of the parts were pre-made, it's not really building but just putting together. Since I didn't mill the receiver or cut the barrel from bar-stock, it shouldn't be called "building" is the thinking from this camp.

*Shrug*

Whatever. I took a stripped lower receiver, a stripper upper receiver and a boatload of parts and turned them into a functioning rifle. I'm pretty darn excited about it, and very pleased with how it turned out. It's quite the shooter, and I'm hoping to put a hurting on the local coyote population (and distant prairie dog population) with it in the near future.


Not bad for a first attempt, if I do say so myself...

That is all.

8 comments:

Atom Smasher said...

Same argument I've heard for years from the Dean Wormers of the model-building world: The ILM guys "built" their models for Star Wars, but the 1/72 plastic model I put together was "only" "assembled".

By that logic I never "make" spaghetti sauce because I didn't raise my own cattle for the ground beef and I use canned tomato sauce as a base in which I put the chopped onions, spices, garlic, more garlic, the garlic, and then the garlic.

Pfft. You built it.

Glenn B said...

So, by that assemble versus build logic, a bricklayer does not build a wall but assembles it. A crew who puts up a house also only assembles it, that is unless they cut the lumber, mine the ore to make the nails, then put their makings into a blast furnace and so on. People need to give nit picking over semantics a break at some point.

Angus McThag said...

Engines assembled by hot-rodders have been known as builds for decades.

Hardly a machinist among them.

The Displaced Louisiana Guy said...

Holy crap! A gun post! (I kid, I kid)... I actually read the article a few days ago, and enjoyed it, but I still like coming over here. This place feels like stopping by an old friend's house, ya know? It's cool to see gun content here again! (Not that I don't appreciate the car posts!)

Keep up the solid work, Jay. Here or over at Shooting Illustrated, I still love reading your stuff.

mbumgua said...

Very nice build--I like it! i have built about 9 of these now--It is addicting. I started out with a basic build and then started getting fancier and fancier. Last build was a 300 Blackout. Let us know how it shoots!

John said...

mbumqua nailed the key point, "it is addicting."

Yep. Way addicting and a huge bunch of fun.

One of the many winter projects is to get moving on the next 80 percent aluminum lower.

libertyman said...

Watch the "Gunsmith of Colonial Williamsburg" on DVD for someone who makes a flintlock from scratch. How many people today could do all the operations that fellow does in the film. Not many I would say.

So yes, you assemble a gun from components. But those components are ones that you chose for your ideas of what you feel is best for you. Kind of like small scale hot rodding. Sounds like I should start on my own project soon, as it looks like fun.

.45ACP+P said...

It is a "build". You assemble a kit. When you choose the parts and fit them together, it is a build. Now let's go shoot it! :-)