Friday, May 15, 2015

Friday Car Pr0n #80

Well, we knew it would come to this. Cars introduced in the '80s...


1980 Chevrolet Citation. This is the sport package, the X11. It has a 110 HP V6. The Citation, a GM X-body, was the successor to the Nova. It's pretty fitting that the car that "It doesn't go" was replaced by an anemic FWD mushwagon to signify General Motors' entry to the 1980s. It would take another 7 years to kill every RWD car save the 'Vette and the Camaro, but the Citation was certainly the beginning of the end.

Interesting side note: The anemic 2.8L V6 that was in the "sport" version of the Citation, the plant that put out a whopping 110 horsepower, is the same engine that was in my S-15 Jimmy. With 4WD. And a plow. 31" tires. Yeah, that truck could not get out of its own way. That was another project - a small block 350 would have fit in that engine bay with minimal work needed. Alas, I was stuck with the little 6-banger, until it started rotting out from under me. At all of 4 years old...

The 1980s may have been great for legwarmers and Arnold movies, but not American automobiles in general.

That is all.

9 comments:

geeknotes said...

The 80s sucked for cars because the hippies screwed up the 70s so badly, culminating in Carter-era gasoline shortages and 55 MPH maximum speed limits. I blame the dirty hippies (always a good option). When the Mustang of the era looked only marginally cooler than the Escort, you *know* something was wrong.

Anonymous said...

Jay, I think you're going to have to rename this category. Pr0n is pics of objects of lustful desire. I can't think of one thing about a Citation that is desirable. It was ugly, underpowered, poorly designed and sloppily built. The only 'good' feature it had was that they rusted so fast that they've all been sent to the crusher so no one has to put up with them anymore. My buddy owned one, he considered it a step down from his AMC Pacer.

Al_in_Ottawa

Garrett Lee said...

It was more than 7 years. I had a '92 Roadmaster as my driving vehicle, and they didn't stop producing the Chevy Caprice lineup until 1996. (I miss that Buick. 27 MPG while cruising at 70 on the interstate in beautiful comfort, with the A/C so cold you wore pants and a jacket in July in Florida...)

Stretch said...

I had Pontiac's version; the Phoenix. Had the Quad-4 engine. A/C leaked into the instrument cluster fogging them into illegibility. Fairly cheap but I over 100,000 miles when she was totaled in an accident.

Angus McThag said...

Speaking of Camaro... The third generation was the '82 model year.

If you want to showcase the epitome of how far Detroit had fallen, that's your car.

It's worse than the Mustang II since it was purpose build that way rather than badge engineering a Pinto.

Anonymous said...

I believe the Citation was the car that brought us the term torque steer. Hard to believe that thing could get way from anyone but in some cases it did.

Gerry

AuricTech said...

Circa 1980, my high school's Driver's Ed program had access to a small fleet of vehicles, one of which was the Pontiac Phoenix (as noted above, that was the Pontiac X-car model). I have no idea which engine that particular beast, but I do remember this: it was so underpowered, the power steering drew so much power that you could kill the engine (on a vehicle with a slushbox tranny) while attempting to parallel park. That was, to say the least, rather disconcerting for a neophyte driver....

Mark/GreyLocke said...

You forgot the "Torture" seats.

If you were taller than 5'10" you had to hunch over so your head didn't hit the roof, and the seats offered almost no back support for tall people.

My Ex-girlfriend from way back in the 80's had one and her seats caused me to have to start going to a chiropractor on a regular basis.

Chris in TX said...

To be fair, how many more horses were produced by the V8 in the base-model Camaro of the same vintage? Not saying that like its a good thing, but perhaps this X11 was a rather tall midget, at least within the GM brands.