Friday, March 13, 2015

Friday Car Pr0n #71

Continuing with the "cars that were introduced in the same year as the number" series...


1971 International Harvester Scout II (picture from here. $15.5K? Not bad!)

Now, I was looking for something special to post for this one, because '71 happens to be the year your humble host was born. There weren't a lot of good cars introduced in 1971. Fortunately, the Scout II is pretty damned awesome, even if it was playing catchup with the Jeep for "proto-SUV."

It beat the Ford Bronco (1966) and Chevy Blazer (1969) to market, as well as all of the Japanese imports of the 1980s. The Chevrolet Suburban, of course, is the granddaddy of them all, being introduced in 1934; however even the mighty 'Burban didn't get 4WD until 1960, about the same time as the Scout coming to market.

The Scout - along with the Bronco, Blazer, and Toyota ForeRunner (all in their first generation body style, interestingly enough) - had a removable top for summer time fun. An obvious tip of the design pen to the Jeep, it was one of those ideas that sounded great right up until someone got around to doing it. The problem with a removable roof is two-fold: getting it off, and finding a place to store it where it won't get damaged (yes, Dad G. had a Wrangler that I helped put the roof on/take the roof off for several years).

Still, it'd be a lot of fun to have one of the Scouts today!

That is all.

12 comments:

Ted said...

That scout must be the sole survivor. All the Scouts I remember were serving as farm utility vehicles and were Buckets-o-Rust in the 70's. By now they would all be just piles of red dirt.

Anonymous said...

They were very popular in Western PA as winter vehicles. As Ted pointed out they rusted out pretty quickly up there as well.

I saw a guy driving a cherry of a Scout in DE. He had the top off and was living large. He retired from the USAF and it was his project car.

Gerry

GuardDuck said...

$15k? Wow!

I remember high school in the 80's - the bronco's and jeeps with an occasional land cruiser or blazer were the hot ticket, other than pick up truck, four wheelers. Those that had scouts were looked down upon as the poor man's off road vehicle.

My how times have changed.

Matthew said...

As a fellow child of '71, my formative years were spent in a Scout, after too many close calls in the winter in mom's Pinto.

Anonymous said...

I had a bright yellow one with wood grain stripes. It was ugly as sin but was a great winter car. Sadly rust took its toll and it became a yard plow after the doors started to fall off.

Tirno said...

My dad bought a Scout II a couple years after I was borne.

I learned to drive on it.

The body may rust away, but the frame and engine will keep going like a tractor. My dad even kept the original plastic sheaths that covered the sun shades.

It had everything a dad would want a son to learn about driving a car: Manual transmission? Check. Geared so low you start in second? Check. Shift into fourth gear at 25 mph? Check. Barely gets to 60mph with the engine howling? Check. Oil change? Do it yourself, there's enough room in the engine compartment to put another engine in there.

Anonymous said...

Buddy had a sometime in the 60s, original Scout as his winter car. It was rusty in the mid-70s but that little 4-cyl chugged along and got him to work. Referred to it as "Git 'em up Scout" a Lone Ranger reference.

Bradley said...

Had a buddy in Highschool with a Scout II and it burned just enough oil, that every other tank of fuel it needed about .5 qt, so we never changed the oil, just the filter every 3K miles or so. that was a fun truck.

Anonymous said...

To remove and store the hardtop, you need a pulley secured to a ceiling joist in your garage or carport. Form a loop in the end of the rope that is dangling from the pulley and then tie off four short lengths of rope that will form your harness. The cleat you use to secure the rope should be securely anchored to a wall stud and above the height of inquisitive children.

Back the vehicle into the garage, detach and hoist the hardtop.Knot the rope securely, especially if you have children. Another short rope or two will prevent the hardtop from swaying in the breeze.

If you have a carport use a rope on each corner to secure the hardtop against the wind and expect birds to nest on top of it.
Al_in_Ottawa

Mark Matis said...

One of these:
http://static.cargurus.com/images/site/2008/01/04/23/53/1971_plymouth_road_runner-pic-53294.jpeg
would also be a good pick for '71...

Sigivald said...

The International TravelAll got 4WD in 1956.

They truly did invent the SUV as such.

Anonymous said...

I have you beat by a decade (62) but I have to put in a word the scout here (even as mine is going to a friend with his own shop). The wrangler/cj was a trusty reminder of WWII but for off road it doesn't have enough space to store your winch accessories and bring two friends. The scout has equal or better entry/exit angles (beating the suburban which isn't in this class) and room for four people and weekend of gear. I'm having to downgrade to a more modern ride (work has stolen my wrenching time) but my scout's going to a friend who will rebuild the bodywork and see that it get's the regular trips to the mountains it deserves. IH was far superior during the birth of the SUV, held back only by incompetent (arguably corrupt) management.