Friday, August 15, 2014

Friday Car Pr0n #43

Sometimes, the stars align just so... Here's a timely and numerical entry.


Richard Petty, forever #43, and the Plymouth Roadrunner, better known as the Superbird he raced in the 1970s. With Chrysler's 440 cubic inch monster under the hood, he was able to rack up some amazing wins in this car.

 If you're familiar with Disney's "Cars," you will immediately recognize this as Strip "The King" Weathers:


After posting about the 700+ horsepower Dodge Charger that's coming out for 2015, I just knew today's car would have to be a Mopar product from the halcyon days. When I opened up Blogger to start the post, I went back to last Friday so I'd know what number today was.

Well, today was #43, and the rest, as they say, is history...

That is all.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think the Super Chicken only raced one year before NASCAR changed the rules and effectively made it illegal. NRHA did the same to Jack Wurst Pro-Stock version when he started trouncing folks.

I wish I had one hidden in a garage someplace.

Gerry

Anonymous said...

I think the Super Chicken only raced one year before NASCAR changed the rules and effectively made it illegal. NRHA did the same to Jack Wurst Pro-Stock version when he started trouncing folks.

I wish I had one hidden in a garage someplace.

Gerry

RollsCanardly said...

I believe I read somewhere that they determined the rear wing height by the highly-scientific method of opening the trunk and making sure that there was finger clearance. Sounds legit to me!

Anonymous said...

Awesome Car. (Wasn't it the 70 Superbird that was advertised as the car that brought back the King?) It ran so well that NASCAR changed the rules to limit all Winged cars to a smaller CI engine... Thus negating the Aero advantage and the beginning of the long standing 358 CI rules in Piston, err, Winston, Err, ?Sprint? Cup...

To be precise (Copied from Wikipedia)

... Eventually, cars were made expressly for NASCAR competition, including the Ford Torino Talladega, which had a rounded nose, and the Dodge Charger Daytona and Plymouth Superbird which had a rear wing raised above roof level and a shark shaped nose-cap which enabled speeds of over 220 mph (350 km/h). Beginning in 1970, NASCAR rewrote the rules to effectively outlaw such outlandish aerodynamic devices.
In 1971, NASCAR phased in a rule to lower the maximum engine displacement from 429 cubic inches (7.0 liters) to its present 358 cubic inches (5.8 liters). NASCAR handicapped the larger engines with a restrictor plate



So, yes the aero worked on the track. These awesome cars show how the factories used to compete intensely following the Wins on Sunday Sell on Monday philosophy
GFrey