Thursday, July 3, 2014

In Capitalist Germany, Car Parks You!

Heh. Formynder sends this one in. Dunno exactly what to make of it...

A Robot Valet Will Park Your Car at This German Airport
In Germany, high tech has come to airport parking.

Last week, Düsseldorf airport (DUS) introduced robot valets to take the hassle out of parking for travelers.

Travelers can leave their cars at the arrival level of the ParkingPLUS structure. As they leave, they confirm on a touch-screen that no one is in the car. The robot valet, nicknamed "Ray," takes it from there.
When you think about it, this sort of system makes a lot of sense. The robot valet can "park" cars so that they are very nearly touching, meaning that more cars can be parked in a lot. There doesn't need to be enough room for imperfect humans to navigate rows, or even for two- way traffic - the rows can be exactly one car wide, and the cars can be stacked pretty deep.


They call it "Ray." I think that's hysterical. There's another video here that has actual video footage of "Ray" at work. It's pretty darn cool, although I'd be wary of letting "Ray" take the Earthf**ker - it barely fits in most parking garages as it is; with the lift needed to move it, I'd be afraid it would leave the cap and half the roof at the entrance.

Another interesting thing, unrelated to this story, is how much English has crept into the German language. The above video and the video at the original link are in German, but there are enough English words that I could pretty much follow along. "Parking Haus", "app", and "click" are all readily apparent - apparently the Germans aren't as psychotic as the French about keeping English words out of the language...

I'd let a robot park my car - you can tip them in 10W30!

That is all.

7 comments:

Sean D Sorrentino said...

It has to be purpose built, but I prefer this idea.

http://www.roboticparking.com/robotic_parking_how_it_works.htm

Ray would probably work in existing parking mazes.

lelnet said...

What it'd mostly save, I think, is the space involved in having enough room for people to get themselves and their bags in and out of the vehicle while it's parked. You could probably cut the width of a parking space in half, if you know that the car won't be occupied as it enters or leaves it.

Plus, with robot valets, they can keep track of which spaces are vacant in a central database, and not have to circle the lot for an hour hunting for one.

And you can presumably trust the robots to not take your car for a joyride. Or lose your keys and then refuse to give the car back until you threaten to call the police. (As happened to me at an airport parking lost staffed by non-robotic valets just this past weekend.)

Ted said...

It'a only dealing with 250 cars

Now if was 5000 then you could do things like park cars of similar size together or rows of cars that all need to be retrieved at similar times or use teams of robots that only preposition cars that will be retrieved soon.


But robot or not I'm still not letting a valet park my car.

Will Brown said...

... you can tip them in 10W30!

So, you'll be letting one park your Harley then? :)

God, Gals, Guns, Grub said...

I think that was invented by Fisher-Price... I had one when I was three years-old...

Dann in Ohio

Ed said...

I do not know whether someone is trying to tell us something, but this video was offered at the conclusion of the parking robot video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Gng3sPiJdzA

What could go wrong?

Geodkyt said...

Looks like RAY is wider than the spaces in most urban parking garages I've seen.

But the robat CAN ensure that at least the cars are efficiently parked, without some idiot crowding the line or using two spaces. Plus, minimal accidents from meatbags manuevering their High Capacity Assault Vehicles around the cramped parking lot. And likely no worries about muggings and other assaults IN the parking garage. (Could probably make it pretty burgler proof as well -- after all, there's no NEED to allow ready foot traffic access anymore. . . )