Thursday, June 12, 2014

Non-Traditional Homes...

Now this, this is a great idea.

Hidden Deep Inside the Oregon Woods Is a Boeing 727 — and It Wasn’t Parked There by Accident
It’s something you wouldn’t expect to find hidden deep inside the Oregon woods. Yet, that’s where this Boeing 727 is parked — and there’s a perfectly legitimate reason why.

For Bruce Campbell, it’s home. The 64-year-old told TheBlaze Monday he’s been living in the retired aircraft for years now.

“It’s genesis was sort of a slowly developing element,” he explained. “As a kid I saw videos of aircraft boneyards on TV and the concept sank in early in life and that just slowly evolved into use of a retired aircraft for a home.”
I mean, take a look at this:



Now, one thing missing from the article was the cost. Not just of the plane itself, but of getting it to that particular spot. I would imagine that the plane itself wasn't horrifically expensive, but it must have cost quite a bit of coin to get it to the destination.

I've always had a fascination with non-traditional homes. I dated a girl who lived in an honest-to-goodness log cabin her father built. A good friend of mine growing up had a neighbor with a geodesic dome house. One of my favorite stories growing up was of a couple that moved to Alaska and built their own timber home and lived there for several years.

But an airplane? Man, that's cool...

From an engineering standpoint, it's genius. Airplanes are built to be very watertight, to survive weather and wind extremes that would destroy a traditional home. As for space, for a single person there's simply tons of room - it's about 150 feet long (although not all of that is actual living space, as that dimension goes all the way to the tail) and 12 feet wide. Call it 100 feet by 12, and you've got six good sized rooms. Granted, they're all nose-to-nose...

It'd be neat to design something like that, that's for sure.

That is all.

11 comments:

Mopar said...

If It's the one I remember reading about like 10yrs ago, while the transportation costs were huge, the owner offset a lot of it by selling off as salvage all the mechanicals and stuff he didnt need.

Mopar said...

Yup, it's the guy I remember. Here's his website, which doesn't appear to have been updated since 2006, but plenty of info to waste a few hours of time. http://www.airplanehome.com

phred said...

First reaction was Bruce Campbell! It's not the Bruce Campbell that i was hoping, but that would be awesome.

Dave H said...

"Call it 100 feet by 12, and you've got six good sized rooms."

And that's just the passenger deck. There's a boatload, er, planeload of storage below that, in the cargo hold.

JayNola said...

Just about like a New Orleans shotgun house. Little narrower but the location looks like it makes up for the shoulder room.

SJ said...

For odd objects repurposed as houses, an airplane is kind of unique.

Aside: my own favorite atypical house is this one, which I saw in person before I knew anything about it.

NotClauswitz said...

Not just the cost of moving the plane, but also the co$$t of County Permits, AND then running utilities out to it? Gas fireplace/furnace or LP? Wood-stove? The toilets have to connect to a septic too...

Old NFO said...

Nope, he can HAVE it...

Ted said...

Not just water, tight but AIR TIGHT as well ( which might be a problem ). Assuming that the APU was still in place, it has elec power and A/C ( of course hauling in the Jet Fuel might be an issue, but at least you're off the grid )

Anonymous said...

Airliners have a life limit, i.e. after a set number of hours flying or landing cycles the airframe is no longer airworthy and is now scrap metal and can be bought cheap. Properly painted with alumigrip paint the structure should last centuries against the elements but common household cleaners, urine, and fruit juices are extremely corrosive to aluminum.

The internal size of the 727/737 fuselage is 11'7" and remember that it is a circle so the walls on each side curve inward so tall people may have headroom problems. Max headroom is 7'2" in the centre. The baggage holds are only 3'8" high, I have put enough baggage in them to know that you have to crawl in. A jumbo would be a better choice since the fuselage has a much larger diameter.

You wouldn't want to use the APU, it is incredibly noisy, thirsty, drives a 400hz generator and a hot section inspection can cost thousands. The wheel wells are spacious however so a diesel gen-set could be tucked up inside there easily on a vibration cancelling mounting.

Al_in_Ottawa

Anonymous said...

That might work in pacific NW, but airplane + sun = broiler oven.

years of working flightline in Oklahoma and flying about various middle east locations taught me that.