Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Wow...

'Holy Grail' of muscle cars found in old barn
“Fast N’ Loud” host Richard Rawlings has found what he calls the car industry’s “Holy Grail” — the first two Pontiac Firebirds ever built, the New York Post reports.

Called simply “#1” and “#2,” the prototypes were manufactured by Pontiac engineers and were used as models for the 1967 Firebird, which revolutionized the world of sporty “muscle cars” when it rolled off the assembly line.
Just check it out:

(pic from link)

Now, I don't know if I'd call the first Firebird the "holy grail" of muscle cars. Personally, I'd put the first Pontiac GTO or perhaps the first Chrysler 300C in that slot. Some would argue that the Firebird's not even really a muscle car, per se, as it (and its Camaro twin) was designed as a competitor to the Ford Mustang, which in original trim was hardly a muscle car. Then again, it's hard to argue that a 400 cubic inch Ram Air V8 putting out 325 horsepower isn't "muscle"...

Still, finding the prototype to General Motors' answer to the Pony is pretty awesome. I don't know if I'd pay $65K for it, though - which is the price paid for the unrestored car (well, there were two of them). After a $200K restoration, they're expected to fetch $650K. Which, even to a diehard motorhead like myself, seems to be a little on the LMAO YOU'RE SH**TING ME side...

Then again, if they can get that much, power to them...

That is all.

4 comments:

Ted said...

Right....... Because you can trust everything they say on a "Reality T V ". Show. If it's on TV it must be true .

Evyl Robot Michael said...

How great would it be to have a half-million dollar car that the factory dubbed, "#2"? ROTFLOL!

Roy said...

As long as they are spending their own money, I don't care what they pay for them.

mikee said...

I took driver's ed in 1976 in a brand new Pontiac Firebird, complete with the flaming pigeon painted on the hood. That year, a car dealer's child was in my class and Daddy donated 2 vehicles to the cause of his little girl's getting her license.

The desert tan beauty with black interior had 12 miles on the odometer when I got behind the wheel, and the only alteration from stock was the extra brake pedal on the front passenger side for the instructor.

I was 15, almost 16, had never driven anything other than a lawn mower before, and Mr. Smith the Tennis Coach and Drivers' Ed teacher said, "Take it out on the highway and open it up."

I will never be that cool again, doing 75 on an empty road in a smelled-like-new Firebird.