Thursday, April 10, 2014

Question For the Hive Mind...

A friend e-mailed me this one. Figured this was a good place to ask it...
You know those diamond warning signs with numbers on the sides of trucks?  Or buildings, etc.  I'd love to find a PDF doc that provides a key for ALL of them.  My Google-Fu has been weak lately, can't seem to find a master list... it would be geeky to have one in the car.
I'm guessing he means truck placards, like these:

US DOT HazMat Placards

Each of the listed placards has a corresponding page describing what each sign means.

This guide has several pages listing all the placards in one spot, with descriptions throughout.

Anyone else have a quick reference guide to truck placards for Anon?

That is all.

12 comments:

Dave H said...

Here's a U.S. Department of Transportation guide for first responders who need to be able to identify hazardous materials quickly:

Emergency Response Guidebook

It describes the different kinds of placards and labels you'll see on vehicles transporting hazardous materials in the U.S.

Many times you'll see a 4-digit number on the placard. That identifies the contents. For example, 1203 is gasoline and 1075 is liquid propane. This books lists those numbers too, which can be hard to find sometimes.

Joe Allen said...

There's an app for that: http://goo.gl/3Tpj26

Sean D Sorrentino said...

This is a case where a book works better than the app. Plus, the book is cheap, less than $10 for a full size copy. $4 for a pocket guide.

http://www.jjkeller.com/shop/Product/2012-Emergency-Response-Guidebook-ERG

It seems that 2012 is the most recent copy. The info doesn't change much, so I suspect it only gets updated every 4 years.

I carry a copy in my glovebox. It's entertaining to look up the contents of vehicles and trains, and in an emergency you can take appropriate action. Most times you don't have to do anything special, which is a comfort. I can imagine that it would be useful to shut up some hysterical bystander by pointing to the book and saying, "According to this, that placard says he's carrying denatured alcohol. So pipe down and stop panicking."

Sean D Sorrentino said...

It's even available on Amazon Prime.

www.amazon.com/Emergency-Reponse-Guidebook-Repsonders-Transporation/dp/1598046349/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1397146336&sr=1-2&keywords=Emergency+Response+Guidebook

$7.20 with free 2 day shipping. I might have to get an updated copy.

Max said...

http://ian-albert.com/hazmat_placards/

is a decent place to find vector format files for hazmat placards.

GuardDuck said...

You can also refer to a railroad haz-mat switching and placement in train guide to do a quick test of how 'bad' any particular hazmat substance is.

http://railtown.team.parks.ca.gov/volunteers/Document%20Library20/1/UP%20Hazmat.pdf

Dave H said...

"So pipe down and stop panicking."

Heh. When I lived in Columbus Ohio years ago there was a story on the local news. A half dozen semi trailers had been parked in a vacant lot for several weeks when a neighbor noticed the "radiation hazard" placards on them. they called the police, who called the hazmat team, who called the feds... you get the idea. (I think SWAT got the night off.) Somebody finally though to sweep the area with a radiation monitor and found only normal background levels. In the mean time the police had tracked down the trailers' owner and asked him what was going on. He came out to the scene and opened them up for inspection, and they only found a bunch of empty pallets and crates. He said he told his drivers that whenever they need to park an empty trailer for a length of time to put the radiation placards on them to discourage people from snooping around them.

Jake (formerly Riposte3) said...

Dave H beat me to it - the ERG is the best reference, and it's what we keep on our ambulances. The app is also pretty handy, since you're more likely to have your phone with you when you need it.

Sigivald said...

I personally prefer an app to a book - because I can look it up easier while on the road (obviously either stopped in traffic or with a clear road, because I'm not suicidal or stupid) to see "what's that truck carrying?*".

And it's faster than flipping through indexes in a pocket guide, because software does search really well.

(* Out of pure curiosity, not Fear Of Scary Things.)

Geodkyt said...

http://www.labelmaster.com/hazmat-source/Hazmat-Labeling-Marking-Placarding.cfm

Will said...

You can find a very useful little red book with all the placard info and a whole lot more. Check at any uniform or police supply house.

(Mine's out in my car, and I don't want to get dressed to get it.)

DOuglas2 said...

We had a 2004 Emergency Response Guidebook that we somehow misplaced. It was great, but when we were on the road and saw a new placard I always wished it was on one laminated sheet in the door pocket rather than in a book.