Monday, March 3, 2014

So, You May Have Noticed...

The advertising has changed here at MArooned...

The GunUp and When the Balloon Goes Up banners have been removed. This is in no way, shape, or form a reflection on either institution; rather it is a desire on my part to avoid any connection with commercial enterprise with the gunnie world in my personal blog.

With that said, please welcome Sledgehammer Cycles to the banner at the top of the page.

This, of course, comes at an opportune time. My #1 Blogson has a conundrum about his next motorcycle:
So riddle me this, Harley riders all: should I buy the big-ass bile with all the bells and whistles (for bis-ass $$$) or should I get a modest bike for half the price and invest $1500 on a good seal with back rest for two up, bags, and a faring? I can plausibly install these (and floor boards) by myself. 

Personally, I counseled him to get the big-ass bike. I went from a mid-sized/smaller bike (1982 Honda Magna 750) to the BAH (Big Assed Harley) and I have never, not for an instant, regretted it. The Harley is, literally, ride-all-day comfortable - I've put as many as 400 miles on mine in one day without breaking a sweat. 100 miles on a small bike is *much* harder.

In any case, it's all good - enjoy whatever you get Borepatch!

That is all.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good advice, I have a 2005 FLHTCUI (Electra Glide Ultra Classic) that I rode with my son- in-law to qualify for the IBA (Iron Butt Assoc.) we did a 1000 mile ride in 24 hours and I got off the bike with no issues, he got off his Suzuki and almost fell over. I was 59 and he was 30 when this ride took place.

Sailorcurt said...

I agree with the advice, but gotta say: 400 miles?

That's all?

That's just a ride around the block (with, of course, appropriate "motorcycle shortcuts" included).




Sorry, couldn't help myself.

Jon said...

Well, aside from the whole buying a Harley thing...the bigger bikes of any brand are generally more comfortable for touring. I'd recommend a BMW RT or LT, myself, but that's just a matter of brand preference.

Borepatch said...

I think my post set the record for bad spelling (thank you Steve Jobs for the iPhone keyboard ...).

Anon, the BAH I'm looking at is a 2007 FLHT. It's $pendy and more than a little intimidating (BIG step up from my 250) but there are a *lot* of folks saying I'd outgrow a 750 about as fast as I outgrew the 250 ...

And Curt, the test would be riding to Dallas from ATL for a blogshoot. Probably 800 miles, and I'd expect to do it in a day. Maybe Jay wouold come with me. ;-)

Jon, didn't like the upright seating position that BMW pioneered (at least as implemented on the Suzuki V-Strom). The boys were complaining after an afternoon's ride, if you get my drift. No IronButt on that ...

Dan said...

Having moved from a 650 Kawasaki CSR to an 1100 Suzuki IDR (I Don't Remember) then to an extended break in riding then to a Road King. The Harley is easily the most comfortable. My wife won't get near it so no experience riding with two on it.

Depends on what you want it for... light and handy are not words that leap to mind when describing my Harley.

Mopar said...

When it comes to time in the saddle, bigger is generally better. Just don't limit yourself to the H-D (sorry Jay). Though the price differential isn't quite as bad as is was 15yrs ago when Harley had a year long waiting list for a new bike and dealers were getting $10g over list price, you can still generally buy a better made Jap bike for less money.
Downside: H-D's still generally retain their resale value better then Jap bikes.
Upside: As a purchaser, the Jap bike is a better deal. And the service/maintenance costs are usually lower on the Jap bikes. There is some truth to the old joke that H-D really stands for "Hundred Dollars" because you can't buy anything for one that costs less then $100. While the dealers have dropped the bike prices somewhat to compete against the Jap bikes in the current economy, they seem to be trying to make back that loss on parts and service.