Monday, October 14, 2013

PIRATEHAWK!

Quick recap of this weekend's festivities; will post more (including video) once I get home and can access a real computer (I'm composing this on my iPhone right now).

Here's a few shots from the shoot:



I finally found something that matches the Snubbie from Hell in sheer output. Black powder is very different from smokeless, that's all I'm going to say about that. Dr. Mike says, and I quote, "the hell you say"...


Yes, we did get Stretch to fire the blunderbuss one-handed. I am REALLY glad he is on our side, even if he can't pronounce prosciutto...


#1 Blogdaughter firing the blunderbuss, which was hands-down the runaway hit of the shoot. We're still trying to pinpoint exactly what it was about the blunderbuss that so appealed to everyone. Dr. Mike had a great point - even in the world of black powder firearms, the blunderbuss is an oddity...


Nancy's Sweet Daughter firing the blunderbuss. She handled the blunderbuss with aplomb befitting a kitten overlord...


Your humble host firing the Jaeger rifle. You really don't expect a black powder firearm to be that accurate - but they certainly can.

Big thanks to my red-headed blog stepchild Michael W. for bringing the fine firearms for the shoot, supplying the powder, shot, and instruction, and for his fine tutelage on the firing line. I think we all gained a new appreciation for the wonders of smokeless powder after an afternoon with black powder!

I hear there's a Civil War shoot planned in the spring...

That is all.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

3 comments:

Dave H said...

Um, pro-SHOOT-o, right?

I had the same idea about black powder and accuracy as you did, but when my Scoutmaster let me shoot his kit-built replica Kentucky Long Rifle I discovered my error.

Mopar said...

Since you will be down in the area, make sure to visit Winchester, VA during one of the N-SSA's national shoots. You would be AMAZED at just how accurate black powder civil war era firearms (and artillery!) really is.

GreyLocke said...

The original Sharps was a BP rifle using nitrated paper cartridges and musket caps for proper ignition. I used to know a gentleman when I lived in St. Louis who had several of the paper cartridge Sharps and several brass cartridge Sharps. He is the Gentleman who let me shoot his custom .50-110 and I hit the gong at 800 yards with it using the Vernier Tang Sight. My word that was a SWEEEEEEEET shooting rifle.

And the paper cart rifles were sweet also. The one I got to fire 12 rounds through was a .54 loaded with 125 grains of 2F in nitrated paper, also custom built. I hit the gong 9 times out of 12 with that one.

If you ever have the chance to shoot one of the paper cartridge Sharps be sure to leave the tab hanging out so the block can cut it off. I had 1 hangfire because I failed to do that.