Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Afternoon Yuks...

Heh. Got this fresh off the BLNN and I can't stop chuckling...

New York cellphone robbery suspect tripped up by sagging jeans, report says
A Brooklyn man who police say punched a woman in the face before taking her cellphone was arrested Tuesday after his loose-fitting jeans fell to his ankles, allowing police to catch up to him on a busy street, The New York Post reported.

A witness told the paper that the suspect was ‘zigzagging’ all over the place “but he couldn’t run” because his pants were falling down. The suspect, Joel Donaldson, 21, was arrested two blocks from the borough’s criminal court and charged with robbery, the report said.
Okay, why in the bloody hell was he NOT charged with assault and battery as well? I am *hoping* (although, where this is NYFC, I am not terribly optimistic) that he was charged with strongarm robbery, which is significantly higher up the food chain than a simple snatch-n-grab. I can only assume/hope that this is shoddy reporting and not shoddy criminal charges - but again, it's NYFC. I wouldn't be surprised by anything.

Again, we have yet another instance of someone being assaulted by a so-called "unarmed" person. Earlier today I posted a story with two linked items about people beaten to death. "Unarmed" is a loaded, BS term, especially as the media uses it. They attempt to make the connection of "unarmed" with "harmless", and this is completely and totally false. More people are beaten to death by blunt objects than are killed with "assault weapons", yet the two types of killings receive grossly disparate coverage.

It is interesting to note that his sartorial choices led to an easy apprehension - it seems like he wanted to talk the talk, but his pants didn't allow him to walk the walk...

That is all.

1 comment:

Bill in WA said...

I have no idea how it works in NY. I know in Washington, they cannot "stack" charges for what is essentially, a single act. So for what's described in the account, the assault was part and parcel of the "act" of robbery, so he can only be charged with the more serious of the two crimes. In practice, this lets a lot of bad people get off from a lot of time in prison, but it also allows the person that the prosecutor was "out to get" to escape egregious sentences for what were in essence, a single crime of little consequence. -Not justifying, just explaining. -Bill