Thursday, November 1, 2012

The Comforting Feeling of An Old Friend...

So, yesterday, as my day is winding down and I'm getting ready to head home to change and take the kids trick-or-treating, my Facebook explodes with concerned parents from the local town board I'm on. We all received the following message:
This is [name], Superintendent of [local district] Schools. This morning an incident was reported on the news about [suspect] who is wanted in connection with a sexual assault on a minor. Police reported that he is armed and dangerous and may be headed to Massachusetts, having connections to [my town]. I have been in communication with the Chiefs of Police in [towns in district]. Principals are taking added precautions at each school to ensure the safety of students. We are committed to providing a safe learning environment for all students. 
Great. So half an hour before our kids go out trick or treating, we receive word that an armed criminal who has sexually assaulted minors may be on the loose in our town. Yeah, no pressure there. Needless to say, I picked up a few extra kids in the neighborhood in our walk around town. I also brought along an old friend:


Smith & Wesson model 13 in a Michael's Custom holster.

I have to stop for a moment and give Michael and his wonderful holster a plug here. I carried that heavy, full-sized revolver all over my town (we covered easily three miles last night), and when it was all said and done, neither gun nor holster budged and it carried the model 13 wonderfully. It really distributes the weight well!

Fortunately, there was no sign of the bad guy and the local police were out in force (as they are every year on Halloween). It's unlikely he would have shown up here, anyways, as the town was named on the local news as a place he might be heading - so there were plenty of folks looking for him. Having something that I was very familiar with should the worst happen is a good feeling - but it struck me as interesting that I'd go back to my revolver roots when I had other, arguably superior options.


Now, I carry a J-frame pretty often. I'm confident in my ability to use this revolver properly and to good effect, and the .357 Magnum round has strong ballistics going for it. But 6 rounds with 8 backup? Heck, my Sig P226 carries more than that without reloading. The P226 would have been, logically, a far superior choice ) - I can shoot them both equally well, and with the colder weather they both conceal about as well. But I prefer the comfort of a good revolver, it seems, despite there being other, numerically superior options.

Oh well. I also ride a motorcycle whose design dates over 100 years...

That is all.

12 comments:

doubletrouble said...

Happy there was no 'BG'.

Funny, with all the stuff in the safe, I like the comfort of my l'il 36. And that's only FIVE.

New Jovian Thunderbolt said...

How many times are you expecting to miss this bad guy?

Dave H said...

I'm with NJT. Against a single assailant if you can't hit him (or scare him off) with six you aren't going to hit him with 20.

Old NFO said...

Revolvers WORK... Period...

Jay G said...

Even when they turn the wrong way, yes... ;)

skidmark said...

Sure, it feels comforting to have that old friend tucked away as you are sheparding a herd of sugar-crazed cats around the neighborhoods. But did you stop to consider what you would do with a stampede of chilluns imitating a Class IV Chinese Fire Drrill amongst your legs while you are trying to ventilate Chester the Molester?

Did you explain to them that when you yell "Gee" you want them all to run to the left (but not into traffic) and "Haw" means to it but to the right, and then practice it a few times?

Sorry to harsh on your Mr. Good-Guy feelings, but these things need to be considered unless you in fact regularly and successfully practice force-on-force with kiddies underfoot screaming like the banshees they were pretending to be last night. Which is why some folks play sgepard/road guard while others provide over-watch from outside the herd.

(No, I no longer spend time thinking and worrying about stuff like this. Not having rugrats any more has lowered the worrywart level to Defcon Two most of the time. But I used to plan Defcon VI trick-or-treat forays back in the day. :>) )

stay safe.

Jay G said...

skidmark,

Excellent, excellent points, no question about that. We haven't gotten that intricate in training with the kids; I will admit to some pride that they do, in fact, listen to "the dad voice" (and I use it sparingly for that reason).

Force-on-force training would be useful; I do not mean to debate that in any way; however from my personal view, I'd rather rely on harsh language and a gun than harsh language alone. I am confident in my skill, ability, and judgement enough that in a situation as you describe I could use - or not use - an appropriate and safe level of force.

Well, not safe for the bad guy, of course...

Definitely something to consider, though, especially for folks that don't normally herd sugar-fueled cats...

Geodkyt said...

Hey, that's why Nancy R. & I taught our daughter to go for cover & armed reinforcements when either of us shouts, "Wolf!"

Of course, we also taught her that it is not only "OK", but expected that she turn into an extremely loud, rabid, chainsaw grenade set on 11, should someone try to snatch her.

As parents, we figure it's our primary role to ensure she is a witness, not the subject of the ME's inquest.

Damocles said...

“Chainsaw grenade set on 11" just made my morning. My own house apes were likewise trained. If shooting is required they are now of the age and training that they would “get small” on command, but, as Jay acknowledges, Skidmark brings up a very good point. Many moons ago I was a LEO and taught ccw in my state. I instructed my students (mostly new or novice shooters) to be as realistic in training as was safe and practical. Carry a briefcase every day? Take it to the range and practice shooting with it carried as usual. Gotta drop a laptop or something valuable? Practice with a binder so at the moment of need you don’t freeze thinking “But it’s my brand new Hal Junior 3000!” while some troll perforates you.

To drive the “crap happens at the worst moment possible” lesson, I had my wife swing by near the end of each class with which ever of my kids was between toddler and 6, and awake enough to participate. She would open the door to the training room and flush the little bugger in. Inevitably the test subject would see a room full of strange people with Dad at the other end and beat feet straight to my leg in classic save me mode. It was a valuable segue into a “how do you engage an armed opponent with precious cargo in hand?” discussion. Answer: Learn to shield kid while shooting which, depending on size, age and mobility of child, usually meant held in weak arm on hip, body twisted so hitting them meant a through and through on me, in my situation. Your results will vary and are dependant on your situation. The point of the lesson was simply to point out that in real life a gun fight is a dynamic event and standing on a target range punching holes in paper without considering normal life factors will not fully prepare you. And to answer the question every class asked me, yes, each of my kids had, at some point, been on the range, in my weak arm (eyes and ears firmly affixed) while I practiced just such a scenario. For the record each one loved it and all are very active shooters today.

And Jay, when I was a kid I thought my dad just loved Halloween because he always came along, and this in a place and time when crimes against kids were very rare. Later, as a dad, I learned the real reason he walked along, and followed his example. A hat tip to you, Sir, for doing what others in your neck of the woods might or would not: being ready, and able, to defend your kids (and others kids I suspect) and not count on the authorities or the Fates to intervene.

Stretch said...

Hum ... the parent that caught my attention last night was in costume.
Black cat with seamed hose, short skirt and ears on hair band. She could have had a BAR slung over her shoulder and I wouldn't have notice.

Situational awareness shot to hell.

Roadkill said...

.357 is a good caliber for cold weather clothing. It is ironic, that when I went out to check some stuff around the property on Halloween, I was packing my trusty old GP-100 with two speedloaders and a powerful 2Dcell Fenix flashlight.

Robert said...

Back when I lived in IL (so no carry in any form), I would do my halloween shepherd duty while dressed in a costume certain to strike fear in the hearts of adults: I wore my business attire carrying a heavy bludgeoning briefcase labeled with the letters IRS and a big-assed Maglite. The grownups got it- the kids just thought I was weird.