Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Yep, Voter Fraud Is A GOP Talking Point All Right...

That's what they tell us, right? There's no such thing as voter fraud, there's no need to show ID or have any accountability for voting, right?

Vodka for votes: Arkansas rep, operatives await sentencing in fraud scheme
The plan: offering cheap vodka ... for votes. It was part of a scheme to steal an election in eastern Arkansas that included absentee ballot fraud and buying votes with money, food and even alcohol.

"I guess I always knew all along it was wrong, but I really didn't think it was that big a deal," explained former Democratic state Rep. Hudson Hallum. "I always heard ... that's what everybody did."

Wait, wait, wait. I thought that voter fraud was a myth the GOP used to restrict voting rights? It's extremely rare, and therefore we need not worry about it, right? I mean, UFO sightings are more common...

It's pretty telling, is it not, that so much (virtual) ink is spilled telling us how unconcerned we should be about voting fraud. Requiring ID will turn people away! Making it hard to vote adversely affects the [insert oppressed group du jour here]! Look, the facts are pretty simple. When it comes to voting, participation is abysmal as it is. Less than half of eligible voters will turn out in a heated race; often the number is well below a quarter.

So, those that go are the committed, the informed, those that have skin in the game or at least a vested interest in the process. You mean to tell me that having to show some form of ID is going to magically make them not vote? They're going the other 50 - 75% of registered voters that can't get off the couch to get to the polls? I think not. I think those that want to vote, that want to participate in our little experiment in democracy, will find any changes in the voting rules to be less than inconsequential to the process.

I think that voter fraud remains a "myth" because it's incredibly hard to document given our secret ballot system. Now, we need - absolutely - to maintain the secrecy of the ballot, no question there. Why, then, do those that claim that tightening laws on voting will keep people out? They claim - with a straight face - that requiring ID will pose an insurmountable hurdle to the huddled masses - as though these same people have no identification whatsoever to drive a car, cash a check, or apply for benefits.

But yeah, voter fraud is a myth - just ask AR state rep Felker...

That is all.

Another dispatch from...
(image courtesy of Robb Allen)

5 comments:

Old NFO said...

Yep, myth... nothing to see here, move along... sigh

libertyman said...

In Australia, voting is compulsory, like jury duty. Seems to work there, mate.

Suz said...

I grew up near "Vote Early, Vote Often" Chicago. Those headlines made me laugh out loud.

Ed said...

If producing an ID to vote is a violation of civil rights, then why do I need to have a license (a photo ID) to carry a firearm? That is also a violation of civil rights.

Daniel in Brookline said...

Altogether, voting is not held in anything like the high regard I'd like it to have. Most people think about it only when it's time to do it, or when it's time to get as many of them for yourself as possible.

Voting is the ultimate statement (and privilege) of citizenship. It's what establishes, once and for all, that our government works for us... and that, any time we're fired up enough to do something about it, we can send the Washington Wombats home.

Personally, I'm waiting for the politician with the gumption to treat this with the seriousness it deserves -- for example, to tell the antis "You have a choice. Require all voters to show photo ID, or require all voters to dip their right index finger in purple ink. If don't like IDs, then you should have no problem with door #2." Then pass a law and make it happen.

By the way: the argument that photo ID requirements will turn voters away is nonsense. People value what they have to work hard to get. If getting a photo ID is so all-fired difficult -- which it isn't -- that'll get more people to the polls, not less.